Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: Jamie Van Etten #122976
    Jim Mighell
    Participant

    It is now 10 years since The comical Jamie left us, he still is missed, including his political tirades – I think of him every time I plant Lily lake near Packwood (he would be very vocal about the deterioration 0F THE ROAD TO THAT TRAILHEAD.

    in reply to: Mine creek pot #122970
    Jim Mighell
    Participant

    Hi Ryan, The upper pot does hold fish and was last planted in 2020 (could use a recent survey) Now a likely walk, but some new vehicles types able to get there would be useful and effective. Small population should be respected if possible.

    Jim Mighell

    in reply to: Lily Lake/Clearwater Wilderness #116887
    Jim Mighell
    Participant

    Hi Steve – Never got back to this to answer your last question – Actually not that hard to drop to Lily from Summit trail just finding the right spot (where you can actually look down at the lake – steep going on some loose rock but pretty safe. Summitt lk Rd, and trail: just repaired last summer, for first time in years, so only a few dicey spots – not like previous 6 years of horrific driving. Don’t try going around from Twin lake – did that once (less elevation gain and drop) but decided not worth it (brush-hole).

    Hope the road holds up for next season. May not ever fix the road to Rooster Comb, unless there is another Log harvest in the upper So. Prairie area. Sad! Much better route to Coundly lake for lots of medium EB , but some of quality size, and lots of crayfish , if you want.

    Jim Mighell

    in reply to: Lily Lake/Clearwater Wilderness #116836
    Jim Mighell
    Participant

    Steve, I have been there many times over the years ,=== This is a little late for your request so don’t know if you already found a way? There are two good ways and one not so good. All are compromised now by poor roads; but just recently, the Cayada Creek road has been greatly improved due to new logging. I mostly took the Summitt lake trail about 2/3 way up to Summitt, and then just dropped, at an obvious open spot along the trail vwery steeply to the Lily basin and take the least brush on over to the lake. Another way is to take the Roster Comb trail from near Cedar Lake (Terrible road now, (only since 2016) but doable off Hancock Permit roads when open). Thngs are much different from my initial trip there in 1965 , when I caught one of the remaining Yellowstone Cutthroats that puked my de-liar to 9 pounds before I released it (too big for my pack to kill); these days , it primarily a RB deal, with some to the 20″ . A third route would be up the Clearwater steamside from the Lyle Lake trail. Haven’t done it, but might work.

    Jim Mighell

    in reply to: Wildfire affect on high lakes #116500
    Jim Mighell
    Participant

    Mt St Helens erupted in May 1980 – at that time Lily lake near White Pass would have been just opening from winter ice – or with some areas of continuing ice/snow on the surface. There are no known surveys of fishing success from 1980 – 1988, there were fishing efforts during that time, as the lake had previously provided large rainbows ( I viewed 3 RB over 3 lb one evening in 1953 at the Steilacoom Ice Arena, where a couple fishing friends came one evening to show off their catch; the lake had a reputation for good fishing. After the eruption Tb ‘s who fished the lake reported poor fishing and no evidence of survival of the 2 pre-eruption plants of Westslope Cutthroat. Since the Eastern Brook were successful prior to the eruption, but not seen in any numbers post-eruption I suggested that Jamie put the lake up for Eastern Brook again as I had a stock of EB at my NMFS Hatchery, from Tenas lake near Hoodsport, that had, in the past, provided large EB (4-5 lb) in that lake, and Nearby Price Lake; authorization was given, and that stock was replanted in Lily lake (records say Ford hatchery EB), so not clear, if original stock in Tenas was Ford??). So it appears that The eruption adversely affected Lily lake EB population (I know the trails in the area had from 8-12″ of ash on them). John Baskin did note that he saw a few fry when he made the replant in 1988 – so some survival of EB may have occurred after Eruption.

    in reply to: Bertha May and Pothole Lake #116487
    Jim Mighell
    Participant

    Bertha May does still produce an occasional very large EB – used to produce huge Rb (5+ lb)– saw several from there, when I was in high school in Tacoma (1950-1953)- Granite also used to be excellent for RB, but my last plant of Rb in that lake (permission from WDFW) suffered from very “hot”-water at planting (nearly 80F);Ifelt that some may have survived, but fish(2″) that were planted, and suffering distress from the 80 F. plant (no way to gradually acclimate the fry to that temp) were quickly grabbed by the abundant predatory sculpins in the lake, and eaten; not sure if those same sculpins are present in Bertha May, but could be a reason why the EB’s there never reproduced successfully, never creating a stunted population mentioned BY B. Curtis, which does create unimpressive fish specimens in so many lakes in which they have been planted.

    in reply to: Directions on how to get into Sandstone lake Yakima Co #116486
    Jim Mighell
    Participant

    I have been fishing Sandstone since 1962 (before any record of plants): has plenty of western newts and occasionally good fishing – but on several years It has been completely waterless (dry); I originally crossed the Bumping and on up the hill, but in recent years, I drop off the top from the rimrock trail and use contour maps (before GPS) to find the way; been briefly lost on a few times in, but almost always get there. Westslopes do well, growing on the abundant shrimp but have never found any over 14″ – believe the dryup kills them often, but also lack of water when frozen over creates an anoxic condition for any survivors for next year.

    in reply to: Wildfire affect on high lakes #115965
    Jim Mighell
    Participant

    I have been interested in this question for several years since my recent experience in the recent fires that raced through the Limebelt area of Okanogan county. I am very familiar with some of these lakes, after having provided fish many years ago at the request of prominent TrailBlazer George Lewis and his friendship with a restaurant owner at Ballard – I have been allowed access to some of these lakes ever since, to fish for “adequate” fish.
    Last spring I fished one of those lakes after wading through ash to my knees on the access road, and fished several areas of the lake with no success whatsoever – my assessment was – NO FISH — that after fast fishing for a variety of sizes to 4 lb shortly before the fire. The lake has been stocked by a local private hatchery every year.
    I have tentatively formed a hypothesis that the huge amount of ash that fell on the lake formed a layer of “caustic ash” otherwise known as LYE, that formed, and slowly descended to the bottom, thus killing any fish that came in contact with that lye layer by burning the gills instantly. I believe that same scenario could affect any lake under a fire.

    in reply to: Your spinning rod/reel for high lakes #99255
    Jim Mighell
    Participant

    I like my 7 piece Cabelas “Make your own-kit rod” that I just kicked my ass to get with it, and built it ; its 4 wt. and 8.5 ft, extremely light weight, that I carry in a 14″ hard case; Finally built it after 5 yrs in the box, putting guides on with 5 minute epoxy and winding thread over the guide feet to hold them on, with more epoxy; not a “Sage” by any means but a delight to cast with. But sometimes I prefer my 3 piece 6′ 9″ rod (3 wt), also Cabelas (came with reel and line for $70.00) That rod will roll cast as far as any fly rod I have ever used; also often use the Curtis technique of mounting the spinning reel on the fly rod handle for the last 40 yrs, works like a charm. When I go bare bones, I use my 5 wt telescopic fly rod (8.5′)(13″folded” purchased from a back east outfit, (can’t remember name), and tape the spinning reel on when necessary.

    in reply to: Bamboo rod info #98618
    Jim Mighell
    Participant

    Interesting – I have a never used (never out of its box) 9′ Shakespeare, that my father got for me by smoking cigarettes that had the coupons that came with the pack (Raleighs); arrived in 1942. I have lately gotten an urge to at least try the rod that caused my father’s premature death from Emphysema at 56 yrs. Like that hint, to not twist the sections. I also have a 7 piece Stowaway (nice feel) that I purchased as a kit from Cabelas, but not sure how many, where to place, and size of guides to put on it; or who might do it for a price.

    in reply to: Looking for suggestions on a lake #98537
    Jim Mighell
    Participant

    Here are a few ideas: Go south from Tacoma on Hwy 7 to Alder Lake lots of shore sites to fish from at state Park , side roads , up near Elbe.

    Same trip to Mineral lake ;

    Kapowsin lake at its south end, has medium to very large Rainbows in spring, and bass later on (this lake is close to Orting. Walk in access along old Railroad.

    Tanwax L. excellent, in same area as Kapowsin but bank access is limited, Rapkjohn Lake in same area can be very good at Access area or out in boat.

    Hike in lakes (2) up Greenwater R. out of Enumclaw about 2 miles in on very easy trail with Eastern Brook 8-12″ and native Cutts to 14″ .

    in reply to: Montana Blackspot Trout #85200
    Jim Mighell
    Participant

    Some of us are in quest of remaining populations of those fine trout; much better than Westslope cutts as they never (or nearly never) overpopulated the lake they resided in, due to their being only moderately successful at beach spawning, and they are also much more predatory (fish eating) than Westslopes), thus, self controlling their populations, and growing larger than Westslopes in the process. Some lakes that had them in the past contain hybrids of Westslope X Montana Blackspot, which may be a better fish than Westslopes also, but more needs to be determined about them – Augusta lake is a good example of such a population. There is also some confusion due to the incomplete nature of Washington State Planting records – because of the silvery coloration of the Skagit County lake’s Montana Blackspots, planted in the early thirties thru the 50.s by such men as Brown Wiseman and Bill Rivord there is some feeling they may have been hybrids of Rainbow trout, but there are some subspecies like Colorado Cutthroat and Bonneville Cutthroat that are known to be more silvery (perhaps because they eat a lot fish) by nature, than Pure Yellowstone cutthroat, which tend to be brownish /yellow in overall hue with no red on their abdomen; when the first federal fish hatchery in the west was established at Leadville, Colorado(?) it shipped west by railroad primarily, hundreds of thousands of cutthroat fry that were dished out to people at RR stops along the way, waiting with buckets; most of those fish were originally Colorado Cutthroat and Greenback Cutthroat, but were later primarily Yellowstone cutthroat; Bonneville Cutthroat were also shipped West from Utah, possibly primarily to National Parks (?).
    Many feel the MBS cuutthroat would be a much beetter fish for our Mountain Lakes, than Westslopes for fishing AND for the health of the lakes invertrebrate populations, and their is hope that they could be re-established, but we won’t hold our breath, because there is a movement afoot that would ban ALL fish planting in high lakes; a policy already adopted by the Washington State DNR, and what if the DNR is put in charge of all federal waters in Washington State ? (which IS being discussed and advocated)- need I say more? . Glad I saw the best of the mountains while I hiked (alone) to 670+ wilderness lakes, planting most, over 57 years of brush beating and climbing; and I’m still out there doing my best to get there, all the while looking for the MBS.

    in reply to: Bigfoot or other strange occurrences? #84695
    Jim Mighell
    Participant

    One night sleeping after a successful day of fishing with my 10 yr old son at Stuart Lake (Chelan) We settled in for nice sleep under the stars (no tent); about 10 pm I found that I was having an attack of GOUT in my right toe (a very familiar feeling of pain); I reached for the flashlight, so I could look at it to decide how to treat it in morn – to my major surprise it wasn’t gout , but an adult porcupine who decided to try and eat my big toe through the sleeping bag – I yelled, and threw the flash-light at it , and it did run off; it was a bit difficult trying to get back to sleep, and took a couple hours till I decided he had left; I drifted off a, but just as dawn was sneaking in (still mostly dark) I felt blowing of warm aitr on my face sticking out of the bag; I very carefully opened one eye, and looked


    directly into the face of a big cougar-I instantly thrashed all over in my bag, yelling at the same time, and it gave a shriek and tore off as I watched him (her) head for the hillside. Son Slept through the whole thing, like always.

    in reply to: Hey everyone…I’m new here… #89995
    Jim Mighell
    Participant

    Yes Dave, It IS OK to bike in – the roads are gravel so a bit more difficult to ride than hard tread.

    in reply to: 4 day hiking trip with lots of good fishing #90010
    Jim Mighell
    Participant

    Dear pcisko (sp?) : I’m going to break with my fellow Trail Blazer here, and recommend a trip that will fit your bill quite nicely, without giving up any coveted fishing info:

    The Seven lakes Basin and vicinity on the Soleduck R. in Clallam County has beautiful high country and plenty of lakes to hit for a 4 day trip- some will have fast fishing some may have only a few fish, but certainly an area worth exploring – I took that trip many years ago on a 3 day trip amd barely touched the lakes in the area – there may be other campers on a holiday weekend, but otherwise little pressure (I saw no one) – Lots of Elk, but don’t go if weather forecast is iffy – can get very nasty up there. I walked out via Hoh R. but a round trip back to Soleduck Hot Springs is great.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)